top of page

SEEKER ELEMENTS
SELECT VIDEOS

How Scientists Are Creating Diamonds From CO2 Emissions
04:25
Seeker

How Scientists Are Creating Diamonds From CO2 Emissions

A UK company is making synthetic diamonds from carbon that's sucked out of the air. But just how eco-friendly are these manufactured gems? » Subscribe to Seeker! http://bit.ly/subscribeseeker » Watch more Elements! http://bit.ly/ElementsPlaylist » Visit our shop at http://shop.seeker.com A UK company named Skydiamond hopes to revolutionize the traditional diamond mining industry by using carbon capture technology to do just that. The company calls it a ‘zero-impact diamond’ because the process pulls carbon dioxide right out of the air. Although, a diamond traps only a modest amount of carbon — one carat contains just 200 milligrams. Pure carbon can take many forms — it all depends on how the atoms are arranged. Graphite is arranged into multiple layers, graphene in a single layer, and if it’s rolled-up, it forms carbon nanotubes. But when each carbon forms 4 strong bonds in a tetrahedral structure, it becomes a diamond. Most natural diamonds were formed over a billion years ago, more than 120 kilometers beneath the Earth’s surface. This is where intense temperature and pressure cause carbon atoms to strongly bond together and arrange into crystal structures. Volcanic eruptions bring these crystals embedded in magma to the surface. When the magma cools, it hardens in long vertical shafts called kimberlite pipes. And these pipes are what's sought after in the mining industry. #co2 #emissions #diamonds #seeker #science #elements Read More: Eco-friendly diamonds made from the sky https://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/54734306 "t took the team more than five years to get the technique right, ensuring they are physically and chemically identical to Earth-mined diamonds. The diamonds - certified by the International Gemological Institute — take a couple of weeks to be made." Are laboratory-grown diamonds the more ethical choice to say 'I do'? https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2020/mar/10/diamonds-lab-grown-climate-change "Diamonds are formed naturally through a combination of heat, pressure and time, growing deep underground until deep-set volcanic eruptions bring them closer to the surface, ready to be excavated. Lab-grown versions recreate this using a fragment of diamond in a sealed chamber which is heated to extreme temperatures..." Why turning China's smog into diamonds isn’t as crazy as it sounds https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/06/why-turning-smog-into-diamonds-isn-t-as-crazy-as-it-sounds/ "After a pilot in Rotterdam, the Smog Free Project is coming to China. The project consists of two parts. First, a 7m tall tower sucks up polluted air, and cleans it at a nano-level. Second, the carbon from smog particles is turned into diamonds." ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested on all the compelling, innovative and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/
Scientists Want To 3D Print Bones in Your Body
03:45
Seeker

Scientists Want To 3D Print Bones in Your Body

For the first time ever, scientists have figured out a way to 3D print bones using living cells. A team at UNSW Sydney has developed a new technique that's taken us one step closer to directly 3D printing bones into a human body. » Subscribe to Seeker! http://bit.ly/subscribeseeker » Watch more Elements! http://bit.ly/ElementsPlaylist » Visit our shop at http://shop.seeker.com 3D printing has revolutionized our world, providing endless opportunities from printing homes, to even modeling organs. And now, scientists are tackling the challenge of incorporating living cells into bone-like structures using a new ceramic ink. This could one day allow surgeons to repair damaged bones by applying ink directly into the injury. Until now, if you needed a 3D printed bone it had to be premade in a lab somewhere, and the process involved using either high-temperature furnaces or toxic materials. Any living cells have to be added after the bone was printed. What’s cool about this new 3D printing technique is it eliminates the toxic chemicals and extreme heat by printing at room temperature with a unique new ink on demand and with live cells ready to grow. #3Dprinting #medicalresearch #science #seeker #elements Read More: 3D-Printing Resin for Dental Prosthetics Cleared by FDA https://www.plasticstoday.com/medical/3d-printing-resin-dental-prosthetics-cleared-fda Desktop Health announced today that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance for Flexcera Base, a proprietary resin for use in 3D printing high-quality dental prosthetics. It reportedly improves on existing 3D-printed dentures because of its enhanced fracture resistance and appearance. 3D Printing Bone Directly Into the Body https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/devices/3d-printing-bone-directly-into-the-body Next, Roohani hopes to work with surgeons, dentists and others to explore healthcare and research applications of COBICS, and pursue a path to regulatory approval. In the US, the FDA has already signaled that 3D-printed bone technologies are eligible for FDA clearance. LEGO-Inspired 3D-Printed Bricks Help Broken Bones Heal Faster https://scitechdaily.com/lego-inspired-3d-printed-bricks-help-broken-bones-heal-faster/ Inspired by Lego blocks, the small, hollow bricks serve as scaffolding onto which both hard and soft tissue can regrow better than today’s standard regeneration methods, according to new research published in Advanced Materials on July 23, 2020 Each brick is 1.5 millimeters cubed, or roughly the size of a small flea. ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested in all the compelling, innovative, and groundbreaking science happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/
How to Trick Your Brain Into Breaking Bad Habits
04:53
Seeker

How to Trick Your Brain Into Breaking Bad Habits

Did you make a New Year's Resolution this year? Research shows that most people stop keeping up with these goals by February. Luckily, there are science-backed ways to break bad habits and form new healthy ones! » Subscribe to Seeker! http://bit.ly/subscribeseeker » Watch more Elements! http://bit.ly/ElementsPlaylist » Visit our shop at http://shop.seeker.com » Sign Up for Seeker's Newsletter! https://www.seeker.com/newsletters One strategy for breaking a bad habit is to make it harder to do. Psychologists call this increasing friction. If you’re constantly checking your phone, turn it over so you can’t see the screen, or put it in another room where it takes effort to get. At the center of every habit is a neurological pattern with 3 parts. First there’s a cue, or trigger, that tells your brain to go into auto-mode. Then there's the behavior, which is what we normally think of as the habit. The third step is the reward. Rewards cause your brain to release dopamine, a feel-good chemical that helps you remember the habit in the future. Let’s say you walk by the coffee shop everyday on your way to work.. triggering another craving for a cuppa joe and also lightening your bank account. You can avoid this habit by changing the environmental cue. Take a new route instead. But what makes a habit so easy to form in the first place? Functional MRI scans let researchers look into how brains respond to habitual and conscious tasks. The first time you do an action, brain activity in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus lights up. This is where a lot of decision-making and planning happens. But when tasks get repeated, activity moves into more rudimentary areas of the brain, like the putamen and the basal ganglia. These primitive areas use up less energy because a bunch of related actions get grouped together, an idea known as “chunking.” This turns the behavior into a habit. #seeker #science #elements #badhabits #howto #advice Read More: Can Brain Science Help Us Break Bad Habits? https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/28/can-brain-science-help-us-break-bad-habits In the modern era, habits have become a significant area of scientific inquiry. Psychologists have explored the genesis of habitual behavior and its impact on health and happiness. William James, echoing Aristotle, wrote, “All our life, so far as it has definite form, is but a mass of habits,—practical, emotional, and intellectual . . . bearing us irresistibly toward our destiny.” Distinctive brain pattern helps habits form https://news.mit.edu/2018/distinctive-brain-pattern-helps-habits-form-0208 MIT neuroscientists have now found that certain neurons in the brain are responsible for marking the beginning and end of these chunked units of behavior. These neurons, located in a brain region highly involved in habit formation, fire at the outset of a learned routine, go quiet while it is carried out, then fire again once the routine has ended. What Does It Really Take to Build a New Habit? https://hbr.org/2021/02/what-does-it-really-take-to-build-a-new-habit “There’s no such thing as 21 days to start a new habit,” Charles Duhigg, author of The Power of Habit, told me. “The amount of time it takes will vary from person to person.” Developing a pleasurable habit, like eating chocolate for breakfast, for instance, may take a day, while trying to exercise at 5 pm each evening may take much longer. ____________________ Elements is more than just a science show. It’s your science-loving best friend, tasked with keeping you updated and interested in the compelling, innovative, and groundbreaking science that's happening all around us. Join our passionate hosts as they help break down and present fascinating science, from quarks to quantum theory and beyond. Seeker empowers the curious to understand the science shaping our world. We tell award-winning stories about the natural forces and groundbreaking innovations that impact our lives, our planet, and our universe. Visit the Seeker website https://www.seeker.com/videos Elements on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerElements/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel Seeker on Twitter http://twitter.com/seeker Seeker on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/SeekerMedia/ Seeker http://www.seeker.com/
This Ocean Lab Is Uncovering the Mysterious Link Between Microbes and Climate
04:50
Seeker

This Ocean Lab Is Uncovering the Mysterious Link Between Microbes and Climate

Studying marine aerosols in the field is extremely tricky, so scientists at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography have brought the complexity of the ocean—complete with real waves—into the lab. Check out The Swim, now streaming on Discovery+ http://bit.ly/dplus-yt » Subscribe to Seeker! http://bit.ly/subscribeseeker » Watch more Elements! http://bit.ly/ElementsPlaylist » Visit our shop at http://shop.seeker.com For decades, scientists have speculated that there is a link between ocean microbes, cloud formation, and ultimately, climate. But the logistics of studying marine microbes in their native environment is hard. So an ambitious team of scientists at UCSD is trying to crack that problem by bringing the ocean into the lab to study its biological, physical, and chemical complexity like never before. This “ocean-in-a-lab” at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, is a 33-meter long pool that mimics the action of real waves. The tank is enclosed and clean air is pumped in over the channel, allowing the isolated study of aerosol spray and gases, which could include viruses, bacteria, and phytoplankton. The first way marine aerosols form is through sea spray. When waves break at the ocean’s surface, bubbles burst, and sea spray containing salt and all those little microbes go airborne. These marine aerosols can affect the formation of clouds over the ocean. They act as “seeds” that water vapor and ice can cling to, condensing into tiny droplets that can eventually become clouds. some types of aerosols can make clouds that are bright and white, cooling things down. So aerosols can have a really big impact on the temperature of the planet. It’s one of the reasons the ocean is known as the planet’s thermostat, because it plays a large role in regulating climate. #oceanlab #oceanography #cloudformation #climate #space #seeker #science #elements Read More: NSF Awards Scripps Oceanography $2.8 Million to Develop Advanced Ocean and Atmosphere Simulator https://scripps.ucsd.edu/news/national-science-foundation-awards-scripps-oceanography-28-million-develop-advanced-ocean-and "For project co-principal investigator Kim Prather, who directs the NSF Center for Aerosol Impacts on Chemistry of the Environment (CAICE) at UC San Diego, SOARS will enable more detailed study of aerosols, particles composed of sea salts, organic matter, viruses, and bacteria that are ejected from the ocean surface when waves break and winds blow." ACTIVATE Begins Year Two of Marine Cloud Study https://www.nasa.gov/feature/langley/activate-begins-year-two-of-marine-cloud-study "